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Alternator retrofit

Forum Forums Tractor/Dozer Engines Alternator retrofit

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  DavidPrivett 1 year, 10 months ago.

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  • #45874

    lenbo
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    I have a Jinma – Smart Track 354 and think I need a replacement alternator. My alternator light is always on and when I check the alternator it only has 12.4 volts @ 1200rpm. Does anyone know of a retrofit alternator I can get from a auto parts store? My engine is a Yangdong 2.4 Liter 7YNDL2.04D01.

    Thanks
    Len
    Semper Fi

  • #45875

    lenbo
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    I did a search on this site and found many different posts on replacing the alternator which has be a little more confused. The alternator on my 354 has (4) wires and I think a volt regulator. I read that other owners have replaced with (1) wire, higher amp rating, and had to replace with upgraded wiring. I want to do this right the first time. I would like more amps to run extra lights. What we be best? a higher amp (how much), internal regulator, change the alt light with a volt/amp meter, do I need to change the key switch, how many wire alternator 1, 3, 4? any other advise?
    Thanks
    Len

  • #45876

    jmayo
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    Yeah, it can be confusing when starting to look at it all, I know it took awhile for me to sort things out.
    I think most have gone with the Delco 10 or 12Si because they are relatively inexpensive, size and fit is good with the Jinma’s, and they come in a variety of AMps. The 12SI is same dimensions as the 10SI but comes in a higher amp rating than the 10SI generally speaking. (The original alternator is something around 15-20 amps, I understand, so even 63 amps is a big upgrade.) Just how much output you may want depends on the added lights and other things you may have planned.

    One wire or three wire? The rap against a 1 wire is that it has to attain a certain RPM to excite it to start charging the battery. (Not an issue with the 3 wire.) Some guys have used a 1 wire and changed the pulley on the alternator to increase it’s RPM at idle. I went with the 1 wire (they have a self-exciting regulator built in), I did not change the pulley, and without reving the engine the Voltage output will climb to 14.5 or so volts. I think I wired the #2 terminal on the alternator back to the Bat post on the alternator. FWW. Advantage-fewer wires to connect.

    One other thing when talking about alternators, is the “clocking” of the alternator. Basically, where the 2 sensor electrical spades are located on the alternator. They can be re-clocked if it isn’t clocked right for your application, but it requires a little patience to do it, so save yourself a step and get the right clocking when you purchase it.

    Changing the ignition switch would be up to you. I decided to replace it because a number of post say the original is doomed to failure, and mine was getting long in the tooth. I was going to have to pull it any way, to make wiring connections, so I thought I would replace the switch first, to make sure I had all my wires right, before I replaced the alternator. (I have this thing about changing too many variables at once. If I screw up, it is just easier to figure out what I did wrong. Been down that road too many times.)

    I think as far as changing the ammeter to a voltmeter is frilly stuff. Just what kind of information you want. Some feel a voltmeter is advantageous.

    This is just some of the things I learned, and my thought process for doing what I did.

    No expert, and perhaps others will correct or add if I have said or have a misunderstanding of something. Problem was making things harder than it is. Wish you well.

  • #45877

    DavidPrivett
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    if you go to a volt meter you can quickly see if the alt. is doing its job or if the engine needs some more rpms to kick in , ideally have both ,but if it was me and a choice one or the other I will take the volt meter.

  • #45878
    Bob Rooks
    Bob Rooks
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    The nominal output of the OEM alternator is 14 amps. Not very big, but at least it is a TEFC type, which the Delco’s are not

    Are you sure the “alternator light” you are seeing is not just the “key on” light? This is the same light as found on your voltage regulator and indicates that current is being supplied to the excitation circuit. If the key is on the light will be on regardless if the engine is running. If you have an ammeter you wouldn’t have a charge indicator light. You might want to consider the newer LED work lights, they are extremely powerful and draw very little power. I have a 11,500 lumen work light on my truck and it only draws 27 amps, but it literally turns night into day for about 1/8 mile.

    Yuchai dozer, Mustang skid steer, Mitsubishi mini-ex, Dual Dozer w/twin laser receivers, '50 Ford COE transit mixer.

  • #45879

    lenbo
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    Good afternoon all and thanks for the replies.
    I started working on my tractor today. Had some issues with the gauges and light switches not working all the time. I found that “Mud Dobber Wasps” had gotten at tractor and filled up every hole with mud & larvae. Even the smallest holes in the electrical connectors were filled. I took the fuse box apart, pulled the fuses (replaced with all new), cleaned the contacts on the regulator, cleaned all the mud out and cleaned all the male and female connections with electrical cleaner, took the gauges and switches out. When I got done the light switches were still sticking so I called Tommy over at Affordable and ordered a new bank of switches. While I was talking with Tommy about my alternator he said it may be the regulator and not the alternator. He said the contacts come loose on the regulator or it just goes bad. I told him about my problem with the mud dobbers and that I cleaned all the contacts, he said it may have cleared up the problem with the alternator. I went out and checked the alternator again and was getting 13.5 to 13.8 volts and when I disconnected the battery (while running) the alternator out put was 14 volts. Tommy said the alt and regulator are fine with that amount of volts. My battery light is still on and Tommy stated that that is a problem even with new tractors. So I guess for now I won’t be putting a new alternator on, but will be putting a voltmeter in.
    I do want to look into getting new brighter LED lights to mount on the front and back of my roof so I can see while working at night.
    My next two projects will be to split the tractor to fix a oil leak and pull the rear wheel off and fix a oil seal leak there…been wanting to do that for 3 or 4 years now.

    Thanks again for all the help.
    Len
    Semper Fi

  • #45880

    jmayo
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    Good deal, I am happy for you. No sense fixing it if it ain’t broke.

  • #45881

    DavidPrivett
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    If you convert existing lights to LED type they use  a less amount of amps so the alt. might keep up easier.

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