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Fuel in the Crankcase

Forum Forums Tractor/Dozer Engines Fuel in the Crankcase

This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Craigermags Craigermags 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • #46004
    Craigermags
    Craigermags
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    I am still dealing with an issue that has plaqued my tractor for some time. I dont use it often but here is the  issue. I have a serious problem of diesel fuel leaking into the crankcase after. The more use the more fuel. After about three or four hours I can drain out 5 gallons of oil/diesel mix from the crank case.

    I explored this problem before with various forums. Some suggested that there is a pillow gasket in the injector pump that has worn out and leaking fuel. Others suggested it was the injectors pushing to much fuel. I have replaced the injectors but he problem still exists. I can replace the injector pump, but not knowing a lot how the pump works I dont see how it can leak fuel into the crank case because isnt it just taking fuel from the tank and pushing it into the injectors?

    Could it be the rings are shot? I have about less than 400 hours on this 2004 tractor. It was sold under the name of Hercules but the engine is a Benye-BY 304-16B – Engine TY3951T .

    Any further suggestions by this group would be appreciated. Oh by the way not that it matters but this is a reverse steering tractor. Its great for plowing snow because I sit facing the three point hitch and can operate the snow blower without the need of cranking my neck around.

  • #46005
    Bob Rooks
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    Man, that’s an awful lot of fuel in the base for that amount of operating time. Are you sure it’s fuel and not hydraulic oil? Because there is no direct path for fuel to get into the base. The fuel injection and priming pumps can be ruled out entirely because they have their own oil sump, and if that sump became full of fuel enough it would be spewing out the vent and dipstick before it went through the camshaft seal into the base. If you were over-fueling enough to let the fuel injection pump and injectors pump that much fuel by the rings there would be volumes of blue/black smoke coming from the exhaust. Something isn’t right. Have you done a compression check? Checked the valve lash lately?

    Yuchai dozer, Mustang skid steer, Mitsubishi mini-ex, Dual Dozer w/twin laser receivers, '50 Ford COE transit mixer.

  • #46006

    DavidPrivett
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    if the tractor starts well in cold weather it is not the rings, I would not think, does the tractor injector pump have its own oil sump or is it lubed with the engine oil ?   I assume you smelled the engine oil and it smells like diesel and it is real thin. but there are tractors that have issues with putting hydro oil in the engine.

  • #46012
    kenotractors
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    Some of the Jinma tractors did not have their own fluid reservoir.  They had a oil tube coming from the crank case.

    When those injection pumps go out they leak all the fuel into the fluid reservoir, either the self contained one, or the crank case.  You may want to look into that.  If that is the case I should have a pump for you.  Would just need pictures.

     

    Nan Pitzer
    Keno Tractors
    parts@kenotractors.com
    866-363-8193
    Phone hours: M-F 8am to 5:30pm PST Sat 9am to 1pm PST

  • #46014

    Affordable
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    That engine does not have a oil line feeding it ? Its Prob. the fuel injector pump leaking by internally causing the problems.Not many other ways for the fuel to get into the crankcase

    Tommy
    Affordable Tractor Sales
    “Your Jinma Parts Superstore”
    http://www.affordabletractorsalesco.com

  • #46015
    Bob Rooks
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    That engine does not have a oil line feeding it. It’s prob. the fuel injector pump leaking by internally causing the problems. Not many other ways for the fuel to get into the crankcase.

    Tommy

    Exactly what I was thinking. There is no other way. I’m thinking it’s hydraulic oil from a blown pump seal which is a more common failure caused by deadheading.

    Cragarmags, check your hydraulic reservoir and fuel tank levels. In either case, one of them should be just about empty. Also, check your fuel injection pump/governor oil level. Let us know what you find.

    Yuchai dozer, Mustang skid steer, Mitsubishi mini-ex, Dual Dozer w/twin laser receivers, '50 Ford COE transit mixer.

  • #46016
    Craigermags
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    Thanks all for offering your thoughtful recommendations and I am sorry I have not gotten back to you sooner, just been darn busy. I did however during this time change our the old fuel injection pump with a new one I had purchased over winter in anticipation for potentially fixing this problem.

    The engine fires right up in cold or warm weather. All it requires is a fully charged battery

    I have not done a compression check on the motor because I know that will take a little bit of time.

    I have to admit I am a novice at tractor engines although I feel I am mechanically inclined. However, I am not confident I really know how these injector pumps work internally yet alone know where I would check the governor oil level so any further education on that would be appreciated.

    So now with the pump in I do have a field project to work on and I will be able to check if there is any issue going on with the fuel. It should be about a two hour job and I will let you know what the result are.

    I have attached a picture of the pump to give you a better idea of what I have been working with. Thanks

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  • #46018

    DavidPrivett
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    if it starts well in cold weather I do not think I would fool with a compression test it has to be good enough or it would not start easy, unless you want it for a future reference , which is not a bad thing to have.

  • #46049
    Craigermags
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    Well guys its been a few weeks since you all wrote to me providing me some thoughtful advise. As I had indicated a few weeks ago I went ahead and installed a new injection pump I had and have now put on about 4 hours of time on it. Everything seems to be working fine.

    The oil has remained clean – no signs of black oil or smell of diesel fuel so I home this remains to be fixed and provides me some good service down the road

    Thanks again for everyone who took time from your busy days to help me out with this problem.

    Craig in North Idaho :bye:

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